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Litigation Attorneys Vs Trial Attorneys – What’s The Difference?

Litigation means a trial, right? So what does it matter if you hire a litigation attorney or a trial attorney? Can’t they both perform the same functions? Not necessarily, which is why it’s important to do your research before you hire an attorney to help you with a litigation lawsuit.

Litigation Attorneys

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First of all, litigation does not automatically mean a trial is going to happen. The vast majority of the time, lawsuits are settled out of court without ever going to a jury. This is due to the work of the litigation attorney or litigator.

Litigation attorneys handle all of the work that happens outside a courtroom. They file lawsuits, gather evidence, conduct legal research, meet with the client, file and argue motions and defend their clients. This is all done long before a lawsuit even gets close to going to a judge and jury. Litigators may even attempt mediation to achieve an out of court settlement but if a case looks like it is going to go to court, these lawyers can take depositions and prepare clients and their witnesses.

Although there are differences between the two attorneys, those differences don’t make one better than the other. They each serve different functions and perform different roles. Working with both types will give you the best of both worlds: an expert lawyer familiar with the ins and outs of your case and an expert presenter who can best argue your position in court if it gets that far. Many law firms have both litigators and lawyers on staff, giving you access to both types of specialists under one roof.

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If you prefer to have a single lawyer represent you through the entire process, be sure to ask about his or her experience in court and specifically if it has included cases covering the same legal subjects as yours. Then you’ll need to decide if the attorney has the experience you need to carry your case through to the end or if you’re better off starting out with a litigator and hiring a trial lawyer if and when your case gets to the courtroom.

5 Qualities of Top Lawyers

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Litigation means a trial, right? So what does it matter if you hire a litigation attorney or a trial attorney? Can't they both perform the same functions? Not necessarily, which is why it's important to do your research before you hire an attorney to help you with a litigation lawsuit.

Litigation Attorneys

First of all, litigation does not automatically mean a trial is going to happen. The vast majority of the time, lawsuits are settled out of court without ever going to a jury. This is due to the work of the litigation attorney or litigator.

Litigation attorneys handle all of the work that happens outside a courtroom. They file lawsuits, gather evidence, conduct legal research, meet with the client, file and argue motions and defend their clients. This is all done long before a lawsuit even gets close to going to a judge and jury. Litigators may even attempt mediation to achieve an out of court settlement but if a case looks like it is going to go to court, these lawyers can take depositions and prepare clients and their witnesses.

Although there are differences between the two attorneys, those differences don't make one better than the other. They each serve different functions and perform different roles. Working with both types will give you the best of both worlds: an expert lawyer familiar with the ins and outs of your case and an expert presenter who can best argue your position in court if it gets that far. Many law firms have both litigators and lawyers on staff, giving you access to both types of specialists under one roof.

If you prefer to have a single lawyer represent you through the entire process, be sure to ask about his or her experience in court and specifically if it has included cases covering the same legal subjects as yours. Then you'll need to decide if the attorney has the experience you need to carry your case through to the end or if you're better off starting out with a litigator and hiring a trial lawyer if and when your case gets to the courtroom.

How to Interview a Personal Injury Attorney

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To become a business law attorney, there are a few simple steps. At least, the steps are simple to understand, but doing each step requires years of hard work.

1. Take the LSAT
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a nationally standardized test. Your LSAT score includes points based on your correct answers on the LSAT. Your LSAT score is also adjusted based on your college GPA and the competitiveness of your college. Once you take the LSAT, you must arrange for your LSAT score to be sent to law schools as part of your application for admission. Law schools then compare your LSAT score and other admission application materials to determine which applicants to accept. The law school admissions process is very competitive, but with good college grades, good performance on the LSAT, and a good law school application, you should be admitted to law school.

2. Attend Law School
Next, you need to attend law school. This can't be just any law school. Your state may only let you practice law if you attend an ABA approved law school. Most states require that law students attend an ABA approved law school before taking the bar exam in that state. California is a notable exception. In California, you can take the bar exam even though you have not gone to an ABA approved law school. However, California has other rules, so you should check into those if you are considering attending a law school not approved by the ABA.

Conclusion
As you can see, the steps to become a business law attorney are simple to understand. However, the process involves years of hard work. Determining whether you want to become a business attorney is an important question worthy of careful consideration before investing so much money and time. Many people have thoroughly enjoyed being a business attorney, and for them, the years of preparation and cost of education was an excellent investment.